Bag to Box

Bag to Box

REASON FOR CHANGE:

When we started 6 years ago the blue bags were designed for a ‘fixed’ Value bag offering. Then two years later we introduced the ability to customise a value bag. We are now on the sixth bag design version. Anton and Jayne have subsidised these bags but they have now gone over the $40 each mark to make and this is no longer possible together with other issues which we need to address.
The bags are becoming too heavy for orders and many members are needing two and three bags. The other important health issue is over time the bags are becoming quite soiled and not easy to clean.

THE CHANGE:

Over the next few weeks we will be introducing foldable cardboard boxes which are more sustainable from a monetary and environmental standpoint. We appreciate your patience as we introduce these changes. We need to experiment with what works and adapt accordingly.

How we think this will work:

 If you have a blue bag continue to use it. If you need additional purchase a box. 

If you have recently joined and have been given a foam box we will soon replace this with cardboard foldable boxes which we think (we need to trial this) as to the number of uses. The boxes are returned to the Hub just like the blue bags each week before the divvy. It is important to have standard packing boxes for the Hubster to be able to efficiently pack your produce into but you are most welcome, when picking up, to bring your own bag, take the produce from the blue bag or box and leave the blue bag/box at the Hub each week.(Some members do this currently). 

For the Hubster this will make things easier in that when packing if a member needs another box they can add this in and NAME label them. 

Membership will be $10 on joining and you get two boxes to start. Then: As the box needs replacing you either order one online in your order page for $2.00 or if you don’t return it the Hubster we will provide a box and the Hubster will tell us and we will charge you $2.00. 

We believe this will reduce the barrier to entry for joining Harvest Hub and will keep it more on track with sustainable outcomes. Our goal over the next 12 months is to reduce plastic and to become plastic free. We will recycle the broken cardboard boxes. 

FOAM BOXES:

If you have a morning Hub and pick up in the afternoon. Then, by exception only as Hubsters do not wish foam boxes stacked up, we will provide a foam box so that you can provide an icebrick in summer months. You need to let us know please at info@harvesthub.com.au

Blood Orange Warm Salad

Blood Orange Warm Salad

Blood Orange Warm Salad
 
the Warm Salad is like its summer cousin but intended to warm you on these chilly nights.
Author:
Recipe type: Salad
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • One blood orange per person.
  • 50g baby spinach a person.
  • 1 handful of walnuts, more if you’re feeding a crowd
  • 50 - 100gms Feta or goat cheese
  • 1 Beetroot, pre-cooked and cool enough to peel. Either boiled or baked in foil for an hours (for medi-um to large ones) in a hot oven (220 degrees )
  • All the Beet greens or baby spinach, washed and chopped.
  • 2 cloves of garlic finely sliced
  • 1 tsp of honey per person
  • Dressing
  • 2 parts virgin olive oil,
  • one part balsamic vinegar,
  • a crushed clove of garlic,
  • salt,
  • freshly ground pepper,
  • 1 tsp of Dijon mustard
  • some dried or fresh thyme leaves
  • blood orange zest
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven 220C to do beetroot.
  2. Put your beetroot on the stove top or in foil in the oven to bake. They’ll take about an hour depending on their size. When they’re cool enough to handle peel them of foil & then skin. Slice them and toss them into to the salad bowl.
  3. While your beetroots are cooking make the salad dressing.
  4. Ingredients into a jar, pop a lid on the jar and shake it vigorously before you splash it over the salad.
  5. Top and tail the oranges and then slice off the skin keeping the skins to squeeze extra juice into the salad bowl. Slice the oranges into segments, picking out the odd pip with the tip of your knife. If the white bits bother you slice them off (they contain fibre. Put the segments in the bowl.
  6. Wash the beetroot leaves carefully and slice finely. Slice the stalk more finely than the leaves. Quickly sauté these on medium high heat together with the garlic. Add the baby spinach towards the very end. It will wilt a little. If you don’t want it to wilt very much add it to the salad bowl instead.
  7. Chop the cool enough to handle peeled beetroots into slices. Put into the salad bowl with the sautéed leaves. Throw in the nuts and the small delectable pieces of cheese. Generously coat with salad dressing.
  8. Variations:
  9. For the lactose intolerant or vegan: use puy lentils instead of cheese. You can cook these are drain them into the bowl.
  10. Pre-soak (overnight) chickpeas and then cook and add these to the salad bowl.
  11. For those who like eggs:
  12. Add half a 5-6 minute boiled Dora Creek egg into the salad per person.
  13. For the carnivore:
  14. Grilled chicken breast or thighs sliced and added to salad is good.
  15. Grilled lamb straps or thin stakes sliced in pieces is also good.
  16. And if you love grapefruit, segments of ruby grapefruit add a touch of satisfying bitter to the flavour mix.
  17. If you’d rather not add a teaspoon of thyme to the salad dressing, try a teaspoon of cinnamon it works well with the citrus, spinach and beets.
  18. Cucumber or small sliced red radishes or slices of raw baby turnip will also add another element to this dish. Carrot slices will also add crunch.

 

 

The Warm Salad

 

Like its summer cousin but intended to warm you on these chilly nights.

 

The Basic Ingredient List:

 

One blood orange per person.

50g baby spinach a person.

A handful of walnuts. More if you’re feeding a crowd

Feta or goat cheese: a little goes a long way flavour wise.

Beetroot pre-cooked and cool enough to peel. Either boiled or baked in foil for an hours (for medium to large ones) in a hot oven (220 degrees )

Beet greens, washed and chopped.

2 cloves of garlic finely sliced

A teaspoon of honey a person

 

 

Blood oranges work well with most greens. The baby spinach blood orange combo is a winner for winter – you can feel it fighting off colds and flu as you eat.

 

Use a blood orange a person and 50-100 grams of baby spinach a person. Zest one of the blood oranges and add the zest to the dressing.

 

To Begin:

 

Put your beetroot on the stove top or in foil in the oven to bake. They’ll take about an hour depending on their size. When they’re cool enough to handle peel them of foil & then skin. Slice them and toss them into to the salad bowl.

 

While your beetroots are cooking make the salad dressing. Put 2 parts virgin olive oil, one part balsamic vinegar, a crushed clove of garlic, salt, freshly ground pepper, a teaspoon of Dijon mustard and some dried or fresh thyme leaves and blood orange zest into a jar, pop a lid on the jar and shake it vigorously before you splash it over the salad.

 

Top and tail the oranges and then slice off the skin keeping the skins to squeeze extra juice into the salad bowl. Slice the oranges into segments, picking out the odd pip with the tip of your knife. If the white bits bother you slice them off (they contain fibre. Put the segments in the bowl.

 

Wash the beetroot leaves carefully and slice finely. Slice the stalk more finely than the leaves. Quickly sautéthese on medium high heat together with the garlic. Add the baby spinach towards the very end. It will wilt a little. If you don’t want it to wilt very much add it to the salad bowl instead.

 

Chop the cool enough to handle peeled beetroots into slices. Put into the salad bowl with the sautéed leaves. Throw in the nuts and the small delectable pieces of cheese. Generously coat with salad dressing.

 

Variations:

 

For the lactose intolerant or vegan: use puy lentils instead of cheese. You can cook these are drain them into the bowl.

 

Pre-soak (overnight) chickpeas and then cook and add these to the salad bowl.

Support local bee producers?

Support local bee producers?

Bees pollinate around 70% of the fruit and vegetables, whilst our birds (even the Cockatoos play a role here cracking open seeds) ABC RN discussion Friday 22 August 2014 where they mention the role of birds in polination.

Bees dropping off

It seems that due to the number of bees dropping off some of our major suppliers are importing from Turkey what they call “honey”, as was the case with Bera Foods brand, Hi Honey which showed to contain C4 sugar, that is likely to be corn syrup.

Local Beekeepers

So the upshot here is to buy local and support those keepers who are making the effort to produce. They may be slightly more expensive but well worth keeping them in business Bees at the Boxand maintaining the colonies of bees that we have and the integrity of the honey industry like the Wollemi Honey we provide from the Wollemi National Park.

Manly Vale Community Garden OPEN DAY

Gallery

This gallery contains 3 photos.

Manly Vale Community Garden Family Fun Day Harvest Hub have been providing a fundraiser for the Manly Vale Community Garden since September 2012 with great success raising over $6,000 toward the garden. On Saturday 24th May 2014 Harvest Hub held … Continue reading

Goldilocks spuds – just right!

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This gallery contains 4 photos.

The story of Spuds ……   Goldilocks travelling in the Maitland area, finding these Sebago potatoes, “Ah! They’re just right.” Where the ‘ spuds ‘ Sebago potatoes are grown? Two hours north of Sydney there is a town with 68,000 people … Continue reading

Super Local Broccoli

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This gallery contains 1 photo.

Super Local Broccoli Here is the first of our local ‘Super’ Broccoli, but because Joey is picking only limited numbers at this stage, we’ve put them on as a Feature Veg rather than put it in everyone’s bag. These stalks … Continue reading